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, and give a full lowdown in what to expect in technology innovation and media in 2013. this year being the year that we plant electronic chips in our heads? or is it time for that long awaited apple tv. nick bilton is here with what to expect in consumer technology. and then media visionary tim o'reilly, he looks into his crystal ball that is filled with new data and systems that will change the way we do business. then finally you heard of the $100,000 laptop. then now the $20 laptop. rob nail joins us with a tool that might revolutionize education the way we know it. first we go with nick bilton with what to expect in 2013. thanks for coming back on the show. >> thank you so much. >> gavin: here we are 2013. >> 2013 all right? >> gavin: life moves on and nothing we can do about it unless technology figures that out. what are the biggest trends that are going to define this remarkable year 2013. >> i think we'll finally get chips in our head, and we will not have to speak to people. we'll just communicate. you and i will do an interview just like that. >> gavin: the year of the google
solved those problems with their no loss of suction and steering technology, but those solutions cost nearly $600. two years ago shark introduced their amazing lift-away upright which truly revolutionized the vacuum industry because it too offered no loss of suction and swivel steering technology. but it also featured a sealed system, and it converted into a lightweight and portable vacuum, all for one-third the price of a dyson. even after two years of home usage, the result is over 95% of shark owners still recommend it to a friend. go online yourself to see all the four- and five-star reviews the shark has earned. all this proudly made shark the most recommended vacuum in america. and now shark has redefined the vacuum industry again! introducing the all-new, revolutionary, high-performance rotator lift-away! it's the greatest vacuum breakthrough in the last 20 years. a powerful, no loss of suction upright with enhanced swivel steering for superior maneuverability in and around furniture and tight corners. a lift-away for super lightweight and portable cleaning that tackles the tou
to do. >> how reliable is the internet on satellite these days? >> minimally. it is a technology that is the last resort for the internet. if there is no possibility of a physical connection -- there are fewer places in the world who do not have redundant physical connections. most remarkably, that is africa. they have seen six new cables down the coast where previously there was only one cable down the west coast. as much as possible, people are fromer to move away satellite because of the high costs and because what is known as latency, the time delay in making that trip. >> these centers in hudson, l ondon, ashford, when it comes to cybersecurity, would these be prime targets? >> no, i do not think they would be. i take cybersecurity very seriously, but i think the far greater concern is a threat through the network and not the physical threat of infrastructure itself. these buildings are well secured. these buildings operate redundantly with each other. say google and comcast having interconnecting networks. unit set up in los angeles and los angeles -- you would set up in lo
and as part of my plan i made technology to cut through base businesses a top priority for me the work is well under way supervisor and it's important that it get done in a way that it's thorough and leads to improvement for at this's small business and is that will take time because we know that the plan is more important than and action and i want to give ouch indicate on real work being date of birth to help the small businesseses. this november we launched enterprise zone web appear and it requires businesses to hail in an licks and application fee and we replace that had with an online app where businesses can apply for these credits and pie the fee on time and so now business and is manufactures and other businesses can save time while saving money at the same time. a new tool called smart pdf is being utility liesed by a majority of departments to make it easier for businesses to fill out applications online. departments such as tax and treasure and entertainment commission are now accepting online payments but the biggest task the one that i know you are speak to go supervisor which w
, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engin
in power, with sewer, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy gene
resolutions because it involved ballistic missile technology. china opposes a legally binding resolution. the permanent member of the security council argues such a move could prompt north korea to carry out another nuclear test. japan is working with the united states and south korea to impose additional sanctions, but tokyo's ambassador says the three countries are too distant from china's position to permit dialog. >>> the u.n. general assembly has adopted a resolution about north korea's human rights violations. the document expresses serious concern about what it describes as systemic and or systematic and widespread human rights violations. they include torture and public executions. the text also urges the north korean government to resolve the abduction of japanese citizens and other foreign nationals. a north korean diplomat has dismissed the document as political fabrication. >>> it's certainly not up to the minute, but state-run media has been much faster in reporting the results of south korea's presidential election than they've been in the past. the brief reports thursday,
to being a collector for a more kind of mobile system or a smaller subset. when you mentioned technology, i had forgotten to bring up that we have three reverse vending machines where you put your bottle in and get the nickel back, instead of the other way around. it's an old technology that didn't work to well in the '80s that has been revised. if you go to canada or europe, it's very common there, even on the east coast it's very common to. and they have gotten much better machines so you can now put a machine like that in front of the store. >> is that at whole foods at 4th street? >> no, it's at the safeway at 4th street and one at clement and 7th, safeway and one i believe at the marina safeway. >> are they being used? >> yes, they are. >> they are kind of limited, again, if someone comes up with a shopping cart it kind of shuts it down, but for the family or for folks, that is kind of the small-scale solution. that if we get the prices of those down, they are a little expensive at the moment. that could provide convenience in a lot of neighborhoods. and then you would need that d
, one of which is directing the department of technology to host quarterly radio communication stakeholder meetings with the department of emergency management, sfmta, the public utilities commission, police, fire, and the motorola bay with staff to ensure there is clear and consistent communication about the status of the current and future planned radio communication projects, and directing the sfmta to provide regular reports back to coit and their subcommittees on the project -- on the progress of this project. in addition, in terms of the regular projects for the city, coit has directed the department of technology to do a study as there is not a plan for the current facilities, the condition of those facilities, and recommendations on how to proceed for other city departments' requirements, technical specifications, timing and a budget for the rest of the city to move forward for their -- to upgrade their radio and data communications. i would also note that the regional motorola bay width system regarding that project in february of 2012, the u.s. congress enacted the mi
'm going to go down the line. as we get to our military partners i'd ask if there's other technologies that you think that you have that you want to share about that may be helpful as we start to get into fire season. please share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears,
. at the same time, the nature of military conflict is changing. because of the new technologies like cyber and proliferation of missiles, we are seeing potential adversaries, state and non state actors alike acquire more advanced, hybrid and high- end capabilities designed to frustrate the conventional advantages of our armed forces. this means the military services must remain vigilant and strong and appeared to . to operate in a way that differs significantly from the past. we will continue to face terrorism and deadly attacks by ied's, but we must also be ready for more capable adversaries to attack our forces and homeland in cyberspace. to attack and launch precision strikes against forward bases, to attempt to cripple our power grid, our financial systems, our government systems. to attempt to deny us freedom of action isometric attacks. as i said, the goals of our new defense strategy is to help shape the force of the 21st century. try to adapt our forces and operating concept said that we are better prepared for an unpredictable and dangerous future. we have been determined to avoid
policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional e
, even in the face of all these technology companies that are coming here and helping us uplift our economy, even within that success, you hear me talking about the people who aren't getting those jobs, the people who are making decisions everyday in our streets, in our community, and i will not be mincing words -- it is in the bay view. in in the visitation valley. it is in the mission where their dispute resolution is at the end of a gun and this is the way they're talking. this is the way they're dealing with each other and then with anybody who attempts to interfere with that. you have heard me say even with the success of all of our departments and everything that they're doing i can't give a job to a dead youth no matter what we do, and so i can have the best training programs. i can have a high number of jobs available. eric mcdonald and i can create 10,000 jobs in the summer, but if our youth are resolving their differences with the point of a gun or the end of a knife those jobs are never going to be available to them. how do we interrupt that violence? i cannot put i
. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spe
moved to an area we thought, part two, very big issue. data, technology, and privacy. broca number of debates which include third-party information issues this is a debate. national security of all other issues which is between richardson and couponing. and then we have the einstein. we thought it will be interesting to have a debate about what the new technology is moving forward with his between gen dempsey and paul rosenzweig. and then the communications system law-enforcement act. what's next, susan land out. we are starting with the framework of a week-old legal frameworks for projecting force. we will have to of those debates . to they were going to do cyber warrant attention policies and start off with the tension policies. dry to start off with craig jacobs. and both individuals are quite well known to be, but not to you and the audience. served in several high-profile positions in the government including at the white house to the other partner justice, the department of labor. most recently great served as the third ranking official of the part of labor. in this position
was asked when i was running a technology company before i joined the board of supervisors to show up at the city of the site of a client. that city was new orleans. this was a few weeks after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was aske
guess since those days there has been one important improvement, one technological improvement, that we use expensively to create interoperatability and that is ip networks built of sdparate systems and the network allows us to operate. as you see from our demonstration as you checked in this morning, as you ridge stered this morning, san francisco talking it oakland, talking to this ship, talking over cellular, talking across and with different networks. the challenge for interoperatability is beginning to be met, i would say, the challenge for interoperatability at the same time is about to get much greater. we as a nation are about to embark on the most ambitous, most challenging communications endeavor that we have ever attempted, which is the creating of purse net, the public safety broad band or 4g network. and with that brings the promise of new challenges for sure in interoperatability and new capabilities that we have never had before. in fact, no other country is as far along as we are, even though we're just starting. what we see is the opportunity there to interoperate i
the radio. but with the military this is a whole new set of radio frequencies, radio technology, even before the planning we didn't know what they had. it took us several planning opportunities and meetings to flush through some of that information and one of the biggest take aways for us, as a city we're required to have a tactical interoperatable communications plan. it describes how you interoperate in an emergency or an event within the city as well as regional partners. we don't have that with military and i think that's one of the biggest take aways, we need to really flesh out a document so we have captured who our contacts are, what technology they are going to bring to the table and start that initial planning from the get-go. we also had some technical challenges with land mobile radio. you know, we have the coverage issues, but we were stationed at the san francisco police department command van, i had some very sharp people there who were able to work through a lot of those interoperatability issues so a huge thank you to the police department and also the fire department and
% more than leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. >>> president obama pointed to vice president joe biden to head a special task force on gun violence, charged with developing a specific agenda the president could submit to congress next month. >> each one of these americans was a victim of the everyday gun violence that takes the lives of more than 10,000 americans every year. violence that we cannot accept as routine. so i will use all the powers of this office to help advance efforts aimed at preventing more tragedies like this. and i'm not going to be able to do it by myself. ultimately, if this effort is to succeed it is going to require the help of the american people. >> let's bring in dr. drew pinsky from our sister network, "hln," dr. pinsky, if president obama were to charge you with developing specific recommendations, what would you tell him? >> well, first of all i would tell him it is not just about guns. it is about our crisis with mental health. and let me just step back, about our leaders,
technology. as the ship makes its way northward, the ice thickens to a depth of about four meters. the odin is now barely making headway. speed is about three knots or just over 5.5 kilometers an hour -- about the same as a person walking. the icebreaker turns on word but then fog descends, shrouding the expedition and the ice for days on end. >> we cannot use the helicopter to determine the best course. visibility is minimal. sometimes the boat works itself free and the fog lifts. then you can see a channel about 100 meters away. >> but somehow, they keep making headway. if you have gone this far, turning back is harder. when the ice fins, they try surveying again and lower the dredge to a depth of 3,000 meters to gather samples -- when the ice thins. the geologists hope the stone will be similar in composition to that of greenland. could this be evidence that proves the ridge is danish? >> this is a sign that these rocks are about to split. an expert back home will have to analyze it. >> they have reached the north pole. >> welcome to the north pole. it is odin's seventh time on the north
curriculum standards and i work for a technology company and we're not at that level. preschool with core curriculum that makes for successful individuals. underserved kids particularly to do well in math in school. so there is a big difference between daycare and preschool and that is what we have a lack of is preschool. there are day-care centers. no one is arguing about the lack of and i think our own research found there is a daycare, but daycare didn't do is anything, particularly for kids of color. head start has been shown to be very ineffective, not to disrespectful. they provide a place for working families to place their children, but do not provide the generatation of a workforce of the future. i have to say that when we look at our priority principles and the general plan about serving families and neighbors who are serving youth and child-care, this is one of those issues that is equally as important. so i understand the concerns about noise. and it's actually interesting that we hear this a lot on people complaining about the loss of families and we hear these a lot. we ha
in terms of making technology available for businesses to utilize. so this will help expedite the processing of businesses enterprise tax forms for their employee tax credits. so the processing and administration and it should be making it easier for businesses in terms of even filling out their own forms. so this is now live, and available, and it's on the oewd website, when you go to the tax credit information on their oewd website. license 123, we're still targeting for our mid-january site to go live. we're still on track for that. >> great. >> and we should have for you -- we'll have a presentation for you at the january meeting. the small business net payroll exclusion, chrised forwarded you the press release that the tax and treasurer put out about it. there is no new form, but deals with it on the tax filing form. and and i think it should be pretty easy. small business saturday was a great success. san francisco did very well in terms of number of businesses participating, but we had a mayoral proclamation. the board of supervisors did a resolution. we had the ma
is ted wong with webcor obayashi. we had two engineers being guest lectures at the technology part of tech 21. so they already had their presentations earlier this month. i was going to give you an update on our collective veterans hiring effort. i'm happy to say that we have two of our founding members in the room with us, manny flores and paula ressa of the carpenter's union. back in april we commenced a veteran's hiring steering committee, if you will, to look at issues of veterans geting into the construction field. we subsequently had two working group meetings with alameda workforce investment board, representatives, the edd there, as well as the carpenters' union and city build, as well as mission hiring hall. and what we came up with was essentially we found out that you needed to connect the dots with veterans hiring and a lot of organizations are out there working to support veterans, but nobody is really talking to each other and they are trying to individually reach out to employers and not really in a cohesive fashion. with unions and companies and cbos we needed to d
will continue. investment in science, technology and higher education, encouraging more young people to study science, technology, engineering and math, make sure that we are bringing young minds with the creativity and engineering backgrounds to create the economy is for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of the economy and it must continue. saving the manned space exploration program and insuring the long term future of nasa, and essentials generator for our economy, insuring that stay at home moms and dads to work so hard raising children and contributing to the community to save for retirement. and easing the marriage tax penalty by doubling the standard ridge is a few of the things that i hope will continue to be championed as i leave. it has been such an honor to serve in the united states senate and i leave with the hope that the values that built america into
and technologically advanced these weapons are. all stemming from military weapons. there are even devices that can be put in legally that make them fully automatic. as he read the literature, you see the enormous killing power that is up there on the streets for virtually anybody to buy or obtained. >> you mentioned you have been meeting people and hearing from them. i was curious whether you thought the and are a struck an appropriate tone today. -- the and are a struck an appropriate time today. >> i think there bothas and mine may have been with the people of newtown but it was not evident in the proposals made today. i do not want to comment on the memories and the morning of people, which i am very respectful of the. i think today is one of sadness for me. i hope to honor the memory of those victims by what we do a denture the congress. they as much as anybody in the whole country, their families loved ones and friends are calling for action. >> can you name any new gop members who have come forward to support any kind of gun control? >> not at this time, but i have not had the opportunity to
and gas from shale through fracking and other technologies. now, that is pushing prices for natural gas, which is used in part to generate electricity, down. that helps utilities and heavy industry compete, creating more jobs for americans. now, all of these things put together are sending my runner, the u.s. economy, dashing ever faster down that road toward an economic renaissance, one that offers real prosperity, real jobs for years to come. but running fast on this road requires something else, an investment in infrastructure. that's the subject of discussion i recently had with harvard professor ken rowback, "wall street journal" editorial writer steve moore and chrystia free land. i asked ken how you convince lawmakers that infrastructure money is well spent and how do you ensure that the money is, in fact, well spent? >> i think you have to have firm regulatory oversight. it's not something you can just spend the money and walk away from. but there are the electricity grid, water, aging bridges. there's so many things hardening our cyber infrastructure against terrorist attacks a
of a lighter note, the extraordinary new bionic body suit technology, making miracles for people who never thought they would walk again. we're going to hear from these people. their stories are extraordinary. >> that's true. >>> and we congratulate our good friend, sam champion, who got married yesterday to rubem robierb. a small ceremony in sam's manhattan apartment. all of his "gma" pals were there. robin, still recovering from her bone marrow transplant, looking beautiful in red. lara and josh were there, as well. sam champion, a married man. >> that's great. >>> and in honor of sam champion, we're going to lead with the weather this morning. we're going to start with the snow and ice and wind creating holiday travel tribulations, including for our own meteorologist, ginger zee, who had a rough ride getting from iowa to chicago. ginger, good morning to you. are you okay? >> yeah, dan. we finally made it. and i've got to tell you, that was a formidable trip. i don't need to do it anytime again soon. i think a lot of folks are feeling me, too. here at o'hare, busy. but running smoothly.
to melissa's comment about automation, that is exactly why this is coming up now because technology has advanced us forward. so the ports actually have more leverage in bargaining which is why --. neil: what is wrong with that? what is wrong with that? >> i'm not saying anything wrong with that the end goal, find to have more leverage. if your end goal is to cut benefits you've been offering many decades. this union is striking first time since 1977. >> the angle is to provide cheap goods to everyone in the country. that helps people including those at the port. >> doesn't help if we don't have a living wage in the united states. neil: we used to have defined pensions for folks that work and switched to 401(k). i would live for a day everyone could comfortably retire at age 60, 65. those days are gone. reality it is not same world. shouldn't unions get with it, see reality and see global environment. >> should unions get with it the fact we don't have living wages in the united states and corporations have so much power they're overriding --. neil: what about nonunion counterparts who g
technology to help get people off the benefits. and we can give them skills to go out in the work force. >> that's one of the programs. >> i mean, yeah, we've ruined the whole program-- >> that's one of the programs, you can get more skills and get off the dole. >> brenda: okay, jonas, what's your take? >> and i've got you all beat and i filled out the questionnaire and found a hundred benefits and i realized that was-- i will say, look. >> in bethesda likes you very much. >> and i have no problem helping people with existing programs and shouldn't be confusing, difficult or hard to find. the problem so many of us as people would qualify for them. so less of the country needs to be eligible for benefits, but those that are should have an easy path through a youtube site or whatever to get their benefits as long as it's not everybody. >> brenda: now, toby, jonas has your lines now, but go ahead. >> i know, friends with benefit, knock, knock, hello. and the path to benefits, the way he said it, for him is sounds like, should say the path to your entitlements. now, we have 55% of the peopl
and access control to information technology, to student and teacher training, this pull multifaceted program will be developed by the very best experts in the field. former congressman asa hutchinson will lead the effort as national director of the national model school shield program. with a budget of the nra of whatever scope the task requires. his experience as united states attorney, director of the drug enforcement agency and undersecretary of the department of homeland security will give him the knowledge and expertise to hire the most knowledgeable and credentialed experts that are available in the united states of america to get this program up and running from the first day forward. if we truly cherish our kids more than our money, more than our celebrities, more than our sports stadiums, we must give them the greatest lev of protection -- level of protection possible, and that security is only available with properly-trained, armed good guys. under asa's leadership, our team of security experts will make this program available for the world, protecting our children at school. and w
there is no such thing as an abortion to protect a woman's life or health due to "advances in science and technology." and missouri rep. todd akin's infamous remark about women's bodies shutting down to prevent pregnancy in cases of so-called "legitimate rape." stunned lots of women voters. as a result many vots told pollsters women's rights were a concern. in the end the women's vote went solidly for president obama as opposed to gop challenger mitt romney. and none of the three men who made strange statements about women's bodies won their races. on capitol hill the election brought the total number of women in the senate to 20, 16 democrats and four republicans, and 78 women in the house, 58 democrats, 20 republicans. as budget negotiations continued to loom, women were asked whether having equal female representation in congress would have chaed things. >> we would have dealt with that. it's critical to the country. we need to provide certainty for businesses for our families. so they will know what they're looking at over the next year and again as women i think we tend to be consensus builders
of technology, new and improved bike racks, including the fact that people are starting to ride slightly more expensive bicycles than just the $10 rotterdam-type bicycle. with that, because it make thems feel more comfortable or safety people want assurance that those bicycle racks are safe. just like with your car, you don't want it falling over when someone else pulls their bike out. that there is a little bit of understanding of what it takes to park a bike properly and safely and keep it from being stolen. >> miss rodgers? >> commissioner sugaya? >> thank you. this isn't on this subject, but since it's about bicycles, maybe the question is more directed towards mta or the bicycle coalition, but has there been any thinking and i don't though this. i asked this question the other day and they said there was also legislation, but is there any discussion about legislating bicycle licenses for individuals buying bicycles? when i was a young kid riding a bicycle, i had it take my bike to the police department and get a license. it was put on there with a little metal plate and clamped on th
military-like weapons and all kinds of advance technology weapons? * that's the first question. and the second question is what are the requirements of the san francisco has to take to agree with this? of course i'm with the 911 truth movement as opposed to 911 liars movement. and i just want to know if this part of the militarization of the local police department and what are the requirements. and was this the same person who came before this committee and got $21 million grant just a few weeks ago? i think ever since 911 happened -- because i have a little quiet and not talking, please, on the side there. sir? i'm trying to concentrate, please. chair, could you ask the man over there to -- >> if you continue -- >>> i can't think when someone else is talking. again, we have 401 san francisco city staffers earning over $200,000 a year and they won't let someone talk. so, i hope you'll answer these questions about the militarization and i wish some of this money could go to muni because every day in san francisco is like an emergency now. we're in a constant state of emergency
to intro daus a lot of technology to help with the interoperatability of the civil military exercise. one of the main goals that we had for this was to allow our military a crisis response adaptive force package and opportunity to allow their training and certification in providing the most appropriate military expeditionary force for that scenario. one of the things that we realize in the military when we do these exercises in a foreign humanitarian response, that a lot of our military capabilities are not just for overseas foreign disasters but it also allows the military to be trained and certified to respond to local domestic disaster situations as well. i had mentioned that we had 22 nations participating in rimpac and this slide is a representation of the military and civilian partners that we had participating in this event. and we had many, many international partners and we had a lot of domestic partners: medical and military editionary partners as well. okay, this is our command and control slide. we took a lot of care to get this right. we wanted to make sure that we portra
for testing technology for that information sharing and interoperatability. apm was an online collaboration where we were able to share information and learn how to communicate with each other. one of the things that we realized is we have a problem with interchange of information where we actually are able to share that. and that was one opportunity that we were able to do that. quick net also participated with us, allowed us to be able to have civil social interaction with the military and have us be able to interchange with them and knowing what type of response we had. intelligence carry on program and deployable joint command and control are two of the systems that were used by the military to collect information and organize it appropriately so that we were able to respond and interact with the civilian agencies. so for the take aways, it provided us an opportunity for real exchange and interaction. the military has a lot of capability and sometimes we don't always know how best to modify that in an appropriate response and being able to get together and practice the situation allowe
and technology and command and control and mostly we bring a how can i help you, how can i work to support your mission, how can i make a difference? is your hospital structure so overloaded and so overburdened and so overcrowded and so crushed that we need to off load patients to other counties, to other states, to other areas in the country? do your roads work? do you have a transportation infrastructure, do you have a communications net up? no? we can bring that. we come as we are. we constantly prepare for the next major conflict. in the navy our motto is -- this is big navy's motto -- a global force for good. we believe that we operate on a continuum of bringing heat and light. you are sitting on one of those platforms right now. you are sitting on this amazing lhd, the uss macon island, it can bring the heat or it can bring the light. do you want to get a little twitchy around the world and you want to sort of rattle the cage a little bit and test our will and show bravado? you don't want an amphibious group showing up off your shore. that can be a bad day for you. on the other
the resolve and the resiliencke of these people. technology obviously was impacted so in order to get us a letter in the quickest amount of time possible, they typed it on an old typewriter, took a picture of it and emailed us the jpeg. no scaner, nothing like that, it was a jpeg of a leg. i said, good enough, it's a letter. we took that to ann kronenberg and said here we are, what can we do. in the meantime we did some brain storms, is this something real, is there any value we can add to this scenario? what we came up with was obviously we don't have the deep pockets to send over rebuilding teams or send over thousands and thousands of tons of material, that's just not what we could do. but what we could do is assemble a small team to go on a mission to van and meet them and talk to them and find out more about what do they need and is there an intersection of what we can do for them and in the meantime it gives us an opportunity to really look and see what the situation was and what we can take away from it. so that led to the next question, which all of us in government understan
the homes meet the needs of the particular wounded warriors by crafting the smart technology into these homes. thing that's make the environment much more manageable for someone who is going to have that challenge for their lives they're providing us an opportunity in our lives to get us back. >> michael lost both arms and burned over 85% of his body. a convoy ran over a roadside bomb he found out difficulties trying to get thinged staffed and stuff so. they decided to build a
you're not there. now get the advanced technology of adt starting at just $99 and save $300. with adt, you get 24/7 fast response monitoring that helps protect you from burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. plus remote access to your home. even control your thermostat to help save energy and money. get adt installed starting at just $99. that's a $300 savings. you may even save up to 20% on your homeowners insurance. for everything that matters most. adt. always there. >>> all right. white christmas is in the forecast for much of the country with snowy scenes spreading across the country. [ wind blowing ] it started with a blizzard in iowa, and more than a foot of snow in wisconsin. now the system that brought misery to the midwest moving east. it is bringing lots of snow to western pennsylvania and upstate new york. many folks are used to maneuvering around snow drift, but the weather just before the holidays is threatening a lot of travel plans. meteorologist alexandria steele and our weather center with more. alexandra? >> well, don, a lot of happy kids around. take a
to cooperate with china on many other fronts. we have many other engagements in terms of science and technology, clean energy, collaboration's by our center for disease control, trying to look at the various world health problems, the solutions to which benefit united states as well. we will always have disagreements. we have disagreements with canada on trade issues. we have disagreements with france and mexico and many other countries. there is a mechanism by which we can all go to neutral refereeing of those issues. the wto is one way that we can do that. [inaudible] >> i did not have a chance to read that article. am not familiar with everything that was mentioned in that article. two months before the election, there was this big tough-on- china -- >> the pivot was announced almost a year before that. what set of the discussion of the exhibit was the announcement -- pivot was the announcement of rotating 2000 marines throughout australia. i do not think china should be fearful of 2000 marines hit in australia. -- in australia. our engagement with other countries throughout the asia- pacifi
different technologies including one that starts with photos from a still camera. you take photos from different angles and an amazing software puts them together. >> it can analyze two dimensional pictures, and make a three dimensional model from an ordinary camera. >> they are icing laser scanners. a sophisticated software programmable analyzes the millions of data points and combines them. the image is so detailed it could create an exact replica of the space and everything in it. they are thrilled to get this data now. even though they are not sure how they going use it. >> what exactly we'll do that, that is what we do, we'll have fortunately years to figure that out. >> they are also sorting, cleaning and packing and puzzling over the 43 years of accumulated stuff behind the scenes of the museum. >> this one is a six-foot focal length lens. >> first they have to figure out what they have. next, they decide what makes the cut. >> whatever they do keep will come here to pier 15. after two years of top to bottom renovation, this will be the exploratorium's new home. >> hundred tiny
and exhibits. they are using different technologies including one that starts with photos from a still camera. you take photos from different animals and feed them into computer and amazing software program puts them together in this incredible image. that software can analyze the two dimensional pictures and make a model from an ordinary camera. >> they are also using laser cameras where the exhibits are. a sophisticated software programmable lies the data points and the result is an image is so detailed it could create an exact replica of the space and everything in it. they are thrilled to get this data now even though they are not sure how they are going to use it. >> what exactly we'll do with that, we will have years to figure that out. >> they are cleaning and packing and puzzling over the 43 years of accumulated stuff behind the scenes of the museum. >> this one is a six-foot lens. >> first they have to figure out what they have. next they decide what makes the cut. >> whatever they do keep will come here to pier 15, after two years of top to bottom renovation, huge undertaking, this
of the building and exhibits. they are using different technologies, including one that starts with photos from a still camera. you take photos from different angles and feed them into a computer and amazing software program puts them together into this incredible image. >> that software can analyze the two dimensional pictures and make a three dimensional model from an ordinary camera. >> they are using laser scanners starting in the machine shop. a sophisticated software programmable analyzes the millions of points and combines them. the result is so detailed it can make an exact replica of the space and everything in it. they are thrilled to get this data now even though they aren't sure how they are going to use it. >> what exactly we'll do that that, that is what we do. we will years to figure that out. >> they are cleaning and packing and puzzling over the accumulated stuff hundred the scenes of the museum. >> this one is a six-foot focal length lens. >> first they have to figure out what they have. next, they decide what makes the cut. >> whatever they do keep when l come here to pier 15
's business technology reporter david. >> it's not something that you want to see losing 800 job. that's a big impact here in san ramone. >>reporter: 800 jobs is a fourth of the total work force at san ramone headquarters. chevron told affected work twors months ago but didn't make it public until it sent out an all employee e-mail yesterday. all 5 of these support 7 ron and all workers now work side by side in houston. chevron said the headquarters will remain in san ramone. stewart is president and ceo of the san ramone chamber of commerce. he calculates the impact to the local economy. >> millions of dollars. millions. when you take that consideration property values. all of the tax base for any reason if they were to lose any more jobs. tremendous impact. >>reporter: another concern is what alarm relocation of workers will do to the real estate market. barbara reid foster has been selling property hear for 34 years at golden hill broker. she points out that many chevron workers moved here from lower cost areas and may not be homeowner homeowners. >> ended up renting homes instead
, information technology and project management. >> however, employees in a skilled labor market specialized skill sets are look at unemployment rates even under 3%. >> reporter: but for those in retail, construction or other blue collar jobs it's a tough market to crack for the young and inexperienced like this recent grad, it can be difficult just to get in the door. >> a lot of people were saying that they put in, you know, many resumes, had different interviews, but nothing really stuck. and they went through that over and over again. >> reporter: and that can be frustrating. don't expect those part time phenomena to go away anytime soon. it saves companies money not to provide benefits and with the affordable care act it's going to be even more expensive to have full-time employees. job recruiters though are a little more optimistic about it. their advice, if you are a part- timer, work hard, it could lead to a staff position. >> thank you, grace lee. >>> one week after the connecticut school tragedy the national rifle association has broken its silence. cbs 5 reporter joe vazquez tell
-driven technological juggernaut. at the same time the lesson of 2012 the republican bubble is don't ignore the data that is available to anyone with a computer. >>> second bucket, it's known as the second-term curse. american presidents successfully win re-election only to have a rough ride in years five through eight. sometimes it's souring relations with congress, personnel problems, unforeseen external events and scandal. there is always an issue for second-term presidents. in his first post-election news conference, the president himself acknowledged that his predecessors had their versions of second-term struggles. >> i don't presume that because i won an election that everybody suddenly agrees with me on everything. i'm more than familiar with the literature about presidential overreach in second terms. >> but familiarity doesn't always do the trick. here is president clinton after his re-election in 1996. >> in modern times, second terms for presidents have been either disappointing or disastrous. i'm wondering if you've drawn any lessons on why that's so? >> the things that derail a second
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